Laura Maike

Applying and Interviewing… It’s a Process

Hand drawing a black process diagamIt may seem straightforward to look for a new job. After all it’s as simple as find open job, apply for the job, and wait to hear from the hiring manager. The reality is while you are applying for multiple HR and/or payroll opportunities, you are following a process – with each step in the process requiring varying degrees of effort. You may be applying for new jobs, interviewing and even negotiating all at the same time. In each instance, your goal is to get to the next step and eventually land your HR or payroll job.

Varying Efforts: Not every stage requires the same amount of effort, so while you look for your next HR or payroll opportunity, with hopefully many “irons in the fire,” balance your efforts appropriately. Focus on items that you are going to see the most return on your time investments. Spending hours sourcing openings isn’t going to help if you have an underperforming resume or aren’t prepared for interviews.

Searching: Today you can find numerous HR and payroll opportunities with search tools, LinkedIn, Indeed, etc. Set aside time each day to be on top of HR/payroll postings that would interest you. Additionally, use an HR and payroll staffing firm like Willory to help find unlisted opportunities.

Applying: Try not to waste time and try not to cut corners at the same time. When you are applying for jobs, you know which HR or payroll jobs are a long shot or beneath your current career path – don’t waste your time applying for either. As for the HR and payroll jobs that are a fit, take the time to customize your submission materials to help your efforts to land an interview. After several HR and payroll applications you will have a library materials to will help speed this process.

Interview: You send out countless HR and payroll applications and finally you land an interview – hooray… right? Maybe. Interviewing takes time; often time you have to take off from your current HR or payroll position. If given the opportunity, subtly ask questions on the phone about the position to probe if this interview is worth your valuable time. Nine times out of ten the answer is yes, but your time is important too – so don’t ever be trapped into thinking that you have to take an initial, second or third interview if the position is not right for you. Interviews are just as much about you seeing if you want to work with the company. Everything should be analyzed and weighed, even the scheduling process. This can be indicative of how the company functions and the priority they place on the role.

Negotiating: If you get a job offer, but know that you are close to a decision point with another organization, it is okay to delay your answer while being open and honest with both companies. By communicating with hiring managers you can potentially speed along the process and ensure the most appealing offer. When we’re working with a candidate interviewing with several companies we are always truthful and forthcoming with both clients.

Think of your search process much the same way that a salesperson manages a sales funnel – you have multiple opportunities, some that require more fostering than others, each with a different “close probability.” Look to close the most appealing and most promising position. It should be one that will fit your skill set and cultural needs. And try not to get distracted by a single job prospect. We see this a lot, a solid HR or payroll candidate falls in love with one opportunity so much that other perfectly great opportunities fall to the wayside. It’s important to know your favorite, but be open to hearing these options out.

Ultimately, Willory’s HR and staffing experts can help you find multiple opportunities and coach you along the way with regards to the amount of effort required.

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