Bob

Job Jumper? What To Do When Your New Job Isn’t What You Bargained For.

We see lots of payroll and HR resumes at Willory, literally all types of candidates with a variety of backgrounds. Consider Stacey (name changed to protect the innocent)… Stacey started a job six months ago and approached Willory to help her find a new HR position. But she has anxiety over being seen as a job jumper after such a short stay with her current employer.

The facts are that Stacey took her current job after losing her previous position that she held five years.  She was a budget casualty, and took a job that unfortunately has not turned into what she had hoped. Beyond being less than pleased with her role, the company is hitting some rocky times, layoffs, and low morale. She has great skills, but is unsure about whether she should stick it out another year to avoid looking “flakey.”

This isn’t uncommon; lots of great candidates find themselves in a job or a company that is a bad fit.  Leaving sooner rather than later is not a poor reflection on you or your candidacy for another HR/payroll opportunity.

Take control of your career, start a job hunt from a position of strength – as an employee looking to advance their career – and own the fact that you are in a poor fit.  Don’t blame anyone – when asked, simply say that you look for organizations to stay with long term, but unfortunately, “the position and organization I find myself in now is not able to take advantage of all that I have to offer.”

Don’t misunderstand, this should not be a regular occurrence – the interview is a two-way vetting process designed for you to make the right decision as well. Anyone can make one or two mistakes… five or six makes you look like a “job jumper” and will make potential employers think twice before interviewing you, let alone hiring you.

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